POMPEY POP

Something for the Weekend

12 Comments

Fifty years ago this weekend, my family went off to see the movie the soundtrack of which ended up as the biggest selling album of the 1960s. I’ve still never seen it. Growing up in Pompey, hills were a mystery to me. Our half-term started on the Friday but was only a couple of days. I played football twice that weekend – the grammar school only played rugger (posh see?) but I preferred the round ball game and played for a Sunday team called Pontiac. We lost more than we won. Pompey beat Bolton 1-0 and the crowd was under 12,000 – fewer than they get today.

Manfred Mann and Bobby Breen (?) were on Jazz Beat (Light Programme). I didn’t go to the Birdcage for some reason thereby missing the In Crowd (Thurs), the Action (Friday) and the Paramounts (Saturday) although I had seen all three recently. On Saturday I went to a party with a couple of mates but can’t report anything exciting.

In the Record Mirror’s R&B chart the top five were “Uptight”, “Get Out of My Life Woman”, “Harlem Shuffle, “Going to A-Go-Go” and “Don’t Mess With Bill”. After them the one obscurity (?) was “Hole in the Wall” which I can’t remember. Who was that by Phil?

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Author: pompeypop

University lecturer, longtime local musician and recently historian of popular music - especially in and around Portsmouth. My blog is entirely about that topic

12 thoughts on “Something for the Weekend

  1. I’ve found “Hole in the Wall” on Youtube. Funky. A bit Ramsey Lewis, a bit Booker T ….

  2. The only artistes that I can think of connected with ‘Hole in the Wall’ were a group of session men put together by Magic Montague, who was a disc jockey. This sort of thing was popular for a while, the prime example being Lord Rockingham’s Eleven. Is that moose still loose around the hoose? Many of the session men were first class jazz musicians , either having some fun or else seeing it as an opportunity to earn some good rhino.
    An example of this in Magic Montague was the involvement of Leon Haywood, a soul singer and arranger in his own right.

    • bang on Oscar……………”hole in the wall” ,it seems ,was ‘cobbled together, by radio d/j Magnificent Montaque ,who arranged for a ‘throwaway’ recording session by Booker t and most of The M G’s when the Stax Revue arrived in Los Angeles in ’65……….
      The overall result was to be along the lines of ‘The In Crowd ‘(the Ramsey Lewis hit )……….So that worked !! ,but after adding some party sounds to the result , Montaque also got his name on the disc as credited composer, N Nathan (Nathaniel Montaque ), and duly pissed off a lot of people for getting a whole bunch of money for nothing !!!!!!!

      Happy Birthday goes out to one William (Smokey) Robinson …… 76

      Oh, and 50 years ago I was looking forward to a really exciting gig at The Excel Bowl in Leigh Park…….WHOOPEE

  3. Just as well post this ‘piece of groove up’ while we are on the subject…….go on…….Do the Phillydog , nobody’s watching!!!!!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Otp8RTEPl3k

  4. Hills were a mystery… but what about the Hope Valley? Shame on you, Dr. Allen! 😉

  5. Aha! Loved it – but then it wasn’t alive with the sound of …

  6. Are you sure you mean SIXTY years ago?

  7. Hah! It was the sixties that fooled me. Well spotted Keith – changed now

  8. Well Dave you can add me to the list of people who have never seen the Sound Of Music Movie. Sure I have seen odd bits that featured all the big songs but never seen the whole thing. Come Now….. In 69 Portsdown Hill was alive with the sound of music. We played inside of one of the hilltop forts for I think it was an event for the Chamber of Commerce. We played in the open air with no stage just plunked the gear down on top of piles of Sheep Droppings (god knows what they did with the sheep that night) It could be observed in a diary (if I had kept one) that it was a pretty shitty gig. Very few people danced that night….

  9. Sounds like a cracker, Pete. We could run a series on crap gigs! In recent years they had some blues festivals in one of those forts, called imaginatively Blues at the Fort. Around 1970 I spent a few weeks clearing the undergrowth up there in my days as a council labourer. Memories are made of this …

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